Nigeria

A Complex Self-Portrait of Africa

Holding a retrospective exhibit after only 15 years as a professional photographer may seem unexpected. But such was the timing for Akintunde Akinleye, the only Nigerian photojournalist to have won a World Press Photo prize, in 2007. Since then, he has continued his work for Reuters, capturing life in the heart of Lagos, whose population of more than 20 million makes it Africa’s largest city.

Achieving LGBT Freedom in Africa

My friend asked me if I’d participate in a Pride parade if it was held in Nigeria. He’s a fellow Nigerian who has never been abroad but has watched videos of various Prides. I told him I couldn’t imagine Pride in Nigeria without the thought of people dying. In Nigeria, whenever people gather to protest against an act of the government, police officers attack them with tear gas and sometimes shoot at the crowd.

Inside the Yoruba Textile Art of Adire with Chief Nike Davies-Okundaye

Chief Nike Davies-Okundaye is one of Nigeria’s most renowned visual artists and cultural icons. Born in Ogidi, Kogi State, to an artistic family with a long history of textile craftsmanship, the 63-year-old designer and painter spurred the contemporary revival of traditional textile production in Nigeria. Each piece over the span of Davies-Okundaye’s four-decade career has been imbued with her keen eye for dynamic composition and her vivid imagination which draws heavily on themes from both Yoruba folklore and her own life experiences.

10 Examples of 'Green' Architecture in Africa

We are all trying to go ‘green’: ‘green’ world, ‘green’ city, ‘green’ household. ‘Green’ has become a buzzword for sustainable, safe, energy efficient and/or economic. The Encyclopaedia Britannica describes green architecture as a ‘philosophy of architecture that advocates sustainable energy sources, the conservation of energy, the reuse and safety of building materials, and the siting of a building with consideration of its impact on the environment’.

Uganda Voted Best English Speaking Country in Africa

A study conducted by World Linguistic Agency has rated Uganda the Best English Speaking Country in Africa. After Uganda, the following countries came in closely: South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya and Zambia. Despite their strong traditional accent, Nigerians were credited for taking the spot for constructing good sentences that are grammatically flawless.

Nigerian Author and Marketing Exec Kehinde Bademosi Comes Out as Gay

Kehinde Bademosi, founder of Nigerian marketing school Orange Academy, has come out as gay in a public posting on Facebook. In a similar move Bademosi publically disclosed his HIV-positive status last December on World AIDS Day. Bademosi’s latest announcement coincides with the one-year anniversary of Nigeria’s Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act being signed into law by president Goodluck Jonathan.

Twitterview with Bisi Alimi: Living Positively with HIV for 10 Years

Bisi Alimi is a human rights campaigner and health advocate. He started his advocacy work at the height of the HIV epidemic within the Nigerian MSM community in the late 1990s. In 2004, Bisi rose to notoriety when he first came out as gay on Nigerian TV. The open declaration of his sexuality caused a turning point in the discussion on sex and sexuality in Nigeria. That same year, Bisi was diagnosed with HIV. In July 2012, he was invited to the White House by President Obama for his work with black gay men in Europe.

The Human Security Implications of Anti-Gay Law on Sexual Minority in Nigeria

On 7th January 2014, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan signed an anti-gay bill into law, with punishments including 14 years imprisonment for anyone that enters into same-sex marriage, 10 years for any organization or people that support gay rights as well as any individual who displays same-sex affection in public. This invasive law made Nigeria the 36th country in Africa to prosecute gays.

The Development Costs of Homophobia

"As a gay man living in Nigeria, my biggest challenge was choosing between my sexuality and my job. Whispers were making the rounds about my private life, and I decided it was time to come out. So I agreed to go on Nigeria’s most-watched television talk show to discuss my sexuality. Almost immediately, my character was eliminated. And when my job disappeared, so did my financial security. Like many gay men and lesbians in Africa, my choice was between economic freedom and mental imprisonment.

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