medication

Antibody Shows Promise as Treatment for HIV

Treating HIV with an antibody can reduce the levels of the virus in people's bodies — at least temporarily. The approach, called passive immunization, involves infusing antibodies into a person's blood. Several trials are under way in humans, and researchers hope that the approach could help to prevent, treat or even cure HIV. The work is a milestone towards those goals, says Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland. “This is an early study, but it’s a study with some impressive results,” he says.

A Game-Changer: 86% Fewer HIV Infections in Two PrEP Studies

Two studies of PrEP in gay men and trans women have demonstrated that the availability of PrEP reduced the rate of infection by 86%. This amounts to the highest effectiveness yet seen for PrEP and is superior to most other HIV prevention interventions. Extraordinarily, two separate studies which provided PrEP in very different ways found exactly the same level of effectiveness. The PROUD study was conducted in England and the IPERGAY study in France and Canada.

What is PEP?

PEP is a course of HIV medication which you can take if you have been at risk of HIV infection. The course of HIV medication lasts about 28 days and, if taken within 72 hours of putting yourself at risk, may be able to prevent you from becoming infected with HIV. PEP stands for Post Exposure Prophylaxis – in other words it is a form of protection (against HIV) that you can take after you have taken a risk or had a condom break on you. PEP FAQs.

Sex Without Fear

The new pill that could revolutionize gay life is reawakening old arguments. For some, the advent of this drug is nothing short of miraculous, freeing bodies and minds. For doctors, public-health officials, and politicians, it is a highly promising tool for stopping the spread of HIV. But for others, a drug that can alleviate so much anxiety around sex is itself a source of concern. 

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