HIV/AIDS

Black Gay Men in the UK Almost Twice as Likely to Have HIV as White Men

A new analysis of existing studies on the sexual health of black gay men in the UK has found that despite having similar sexual risk behaviours to white gay men, they have almost twice the chance of being HIV-positive. The findings are published in a special issue of "The Lancet" on men who have sex with men, published last week to coincide with the 19th International AIDS Conference.

Targeting HIV Prevention by Ethnicity: Priorities for MSM Programmes in the UK

This briefing is for people with the power to change the way HIV prevention interventions are delivered in the UK: this includes health promoters, managers with planning responsibilities and service commissioners. The briefing uses data from the Gay Men's Sex Survey collected over the last ten years to examine HIV infection, risk behaviours and prevention needs across ethnic groups.

Making It Count

A collaborative planning framework to minimise the incidence of HIV infection during sex between men.

Strategic Research Goal: We will stimulate and/or carry out research that increases our understanding of the relative and especially attributable risks associated with each of the factors contributing to HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) in England.

Epidemiology of HIV Among Black and Minority Ethnic Men Who Have Sex with Men in England and Wales

Between 1997-2002, BME MSM accounted for just over one in 10 new HIV diagnoses among MSM in England and Wales; more than half probably acquired their infection in the United Kingdom. In 2002, the proportion of BME MSM living with diagnosed HIV in England and Wales was significantly higher than white MSM. Undiagnosed HIV prevalence in Caribbean-born MSM was high. These data confirm the need to remain alert to the sexual health needs and evolving epidemiology of HIV among BME MSM in England and Wales.

HIV, Sexual Risk and Ethnicity Among Men in England Who Have Sex with Men

In order to best direct finite resources, HIV prevention planners need to know which sections of the population they are concerned with are most likely to be involved in HIV transmission. Sex between men continues to account for the majority of HIV infections acquired in Britain. This paper looks at differences in HIV testing and HIV sexual risk behaviours across ethnic groups among a community recruited sample of men who have sex with men (MSM), in order to inform priorities in HIV prevention programmes.

Living with HIV

Living with an HIV or AIDS diagnosis can be a difficult and stressful reality for many people. If you need someone to talk to, or are looking to meet other positive people from a similar cultural background, give the NPL Resilient Futures team a call. More on Living with HIV.

What is PEP?

PEP is a course of HIV medication which you can take if you have been at risk of HIV infection. The course of HIV medication lasts about 28 days and, if taken within 72 hours of putting yourself at risk, may be able to prevent you from becoming infected with HIV. PEP stands for Post Exposure Prophylaxis – in other words it is a form of protection (against HIV) that you can take after you have taken a risk or had a condom break on you. PEP FAQs.

Twitterview with Bisi Alimi: Living Positively with HIV for 10 Years

Bisi Alimi is a human rights campaigner and health advocate. He started his advocacy work at the height of the HIV epidemic within the Nigerian MSM community in the late 1990s. In 2004, Bisi rose to notoriety when he first came out as gay on Nigerian TV. The open declaration of his sexuality caused a turning point in the discussion on sex and sexuality in Nigeria. That same year, Bisi was diagnosed with HIV. In July 2012, he was invited to the White House by President Obama for his work with black gay men in Europe.

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